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Why Wade?

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MINNESOTA MULTISPORT AWARDS - For most of the last decade, Minnesota has been America's unofficial Duathlon Capitol. Our state  has many great run-bike-runs, and even more great run-bike-runners. The list of our state's national class duathletes is a lengthy one, and four of those athletes--WADE CRUSER, BRIAN SAMES, KRIS SPOTH and DANI VSETECKA-- received nominations for Minnesota DOY in 2017. 

Wade Cruser, who deserves to be in the discussion for US DOY, and should earn, at the very least, and HM for that award, was the clear choice for our state's DUATHLETE OF THE YEAR.

Here's why:

- BRIAN SAMES 

1st @ Oakdale

2nd @ Cinco Du Mayo Long Course

Why didn't Brian win? First of all, his racing volume was low. Another great effort, however, would not have changed things. Wade's resume was just too good. And Cruser beat Sames beat him by 2:52 at Cinco....

 

Why Gaby?

  

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2017 MINNESOTA MULTISPORT AWARDS - All four women's MOST IMPROVED nominations were well-deserved, but in the view of all of the Selectors, GABY BUNTEN was the clear choice for the MI award.

Let us explain.

MAGGIE WEISS and KELLY TROM are first-time MI nominees. Both narrowly missed berths on Team MInnesota in 2016, (Kelly came close in 2015, as well) but made this year's Team. Maggie, runner-up for Rookie of the Year in 2016, moved from 11th up to 9th; Kelly moved from 12th to 10th. Though the movement wasn't extreme, what was clear was that both athletes raced at a higher level in 2017. Trom held her own against established Team Minnesota athletes, and lowered her 70.3 personal best from 4:44:30 to 4:40:58. Despite some bad luck and a sub-par performance or two, Weiss raced often and aggressively. Podiums at Lake Minnetonka, Heart of the Lakes and Maple Grove were highlights. Racing volume plus the fact that she beat Trom at HOLT explains their respective Team Minnesota placements.

Then there was NICOLE HEININGER.

Here is Nicole's Team MN history: 8th in 2013, the season she was named Rookie of the Year; 8th in 2014; 10th in 2015; ineligible in 2016 (temporary relocation). Very solid, right? In 2017, she upped her game substantially, winning four times, setting one course record and lowering her 70.3 PR. One Selector believed that she deserved a Triathlete of the Year nomination and to rank 4th on Team Minnesota.

In the end, she placed 5th on the Team. Moving into the Top 5 is a big deal, one that made her the MI runner-up....

Swimming Mistakes...

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By Gary Hall Sr. (usatriathlon.org)

Big mistakes in the swim are not only common, but they also tend to drain an athlete emotionally and physically. Making costly mistakes in the swim will not set you up well for the remainder of the triathlon. Here is my list of the top five mistakes made during the swim, from the most to least serious, and how to avoid them.

1. Swimming off course. Perhaps the single-most important strategy in your swim should be staying on course. It is easy to get disoriented on the swim. It is easy to follow the wrong person on the swim. It is easy to get swept off course by currents. Therefore, you must sight efficiently and often — usually every 10 to 12 strokes, focusing on maintaining a straight ...

From Overweight to Racing Weight...

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Three triathletes share their journeys from overweight to racing weight—and the nutritional tools that helped them reach their goals.

 

By Liz Hitchens (triathlete.com)

 

A last-ditch attempt to avoid surgery

 

When a friend unexpectedly lost her fiancé, despite being young and in great shape, Shad McGaha scheduled a checkup with his doctor. McGaha had been overweight his entire life, so when his doctor saw how high his blood pressure was, he suggested gastric bypass surgery. “It really caught me off-guard—I knew I was heavy, but I had never really thought about it,” he says. “My wife and I discussed it, and we asked him if he would give me some time to try on my own first.”

It was the motivation he needed to join Weight Watchers and buy an elliptical machine—he could barely tackle a 20-minute workout on day one. Elliptical workouts graduated to running workouts which led to his first half-marathon, marathon and—after watching Ironman Hawaii on TV—triathlon. “This sport gets in your blood,” he says. “Each time I swore I was done, it didn’t take long before I was looking for another race.” He realized that signing up for a challenge ...

Happy Thanksgiving From MTN!

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